Still Quarantine Reading

Month two of quarantine and I’m still reading. In between reading, I’m doing puzzles and listening to podcasts (oh, and homeschooling my kids). The outside world may be scary and unsure, but in my house is a library of adventure. I choose adventure.

Read All Day: April

1. The Night Tiger by Yangsze Choo ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Historical Fiction

We were a chocolate-box family, I thought. Brightly wrapped on the outside and oozing sticky darkness within.

2. Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs: Big Questions by Tiny Mortals About Death by Caitlin Doughty ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Nonfiction

We can’t make death fun, but we can make learning about it fun. Death is science and history, art and literature. It bridges every culture and unites the whole of humanity!

3. Normal People by Sally Rooney ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I cared what people thought of me.

4. Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Historical Fiction

Your shoes are carrying your most valuable possession—your life. Do not delay. Everything else can be replaced.

5. The Devil Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

Insatiable, impatient, impossible.

6. Eliza and Her Monsters by Francesca Zappia ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Young Adult

There is a small monster in my brain that controls my doubt.

7. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Young Adult

Try to be a filter, not a sponge.

8. A Woman is No Man by Etaf Rum ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

Where I come from, voicelessness is the condition of my gender, as normal as the bosoms on a woman’s chest, as necessary as the next generation growing inside her belly.

9. The Gift of Failure: How the Best Parents Learn to Let Go So Their Children Can Succeed by Jessica Lahey ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Parenting

In order to help children make the most of their education, parents must begin to relinquish control and focus on three goals: embracing opportunities to fail, finding ways to learn from that failure, and creating positive home-school relationships.

10. The Silent Patient by Alex Michaelides ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Mystery

Choosing a lover is a lot like choosing a therapist. We need to ask ourselves, is this someone who will be honest with me, listen to criticism, admit making mistakes, and not promise the impossible?

11. The Watsons Go to Birmingham-1963 by Christopher Paul Curtis ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Historial Fiction

I learned about getting saved. I learned how someone could come to you when you were feeling real, real bad and could take all of your problems away and make you feel better. I learned that the person who saved you, your personal saver, was sent by God to protect you and to help you out.

12. I’ve Got Your Number by Sophie Kinsella ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

My phone’s my life. I can’t exist without it. It’s a vital organ.

13. Evvie Drake Starts Over by Linda Holmes ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

Your head is the house you live in, so you have to do the maintenance.

14. Dear Girls: Intimate Tales, Untold Secrets, & Advice for Living Your Best Life by Ali Wong ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Autobiography

The answers to making it, to me, are a lot more universal than anyone’s race or gender, and center on having a tolerance for delayed gratification, a passion for the craft, and a willingness to fail.

15. Get Well Soon: History’s Worst Plagues and the Heroes Who Fought Them by Jennifer Wright ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Nonfiction Science

Diseases don’t ruin lives just because they rot off noses. They destroy people if the rest of society isolates them and treats them as undeserving of help and respect.

16. The Second Sister by Claire Kendal ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Mystery

Why are so many fairytales about sisters saving their brothers? All the ones you told me last week were.

He is right. Hansel and Gretel. The Seven Ravens. The Twelve Brothers. Our mother seemed to know hundreds of them.

We should write a different story. I want one with a sister who saves her sister.

17. When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

I feel like we just stepped into an episode of Housewives.

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

Pandemic Reading List

I have always loved reading about diseases and their effects on communities. Even though I knew the reality of living through one, I never really imagined I would. Well, here we are. So, here’s a short list of the books I’ve read in the past, never imagining I could possibly be a character in a similar story in the future.

Oh, and my favorite podcast:)

1. Ghost Map: The Story of London’s Most Terrifying Epidemic-and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World by Steven Johnson

From Steven Johnson, the dynamic thinker routinely compared to James Gleick, Dava Sobel, and Malcolm Gladwell, The Ghost Map is a riveting page-turner about a real-life historical hero, Dr. John Snow. It’s the summer of 1854, and London is just emerging as one of the first modern cities in the world. But lacking the infrastructure—garbage removal, clean water, sewers—necessary to support its rapidly expanding population, the city has become the perfect breeding ground for a terrifying disease no one knows how to cure. As the cholera outbreak takes hold, a physician and a local curate are spurred to action—and ultimately solve the most pressing medical riddle of their time. In a triumph of multidisciplinary thinking, Johnson illuminates the intertwined histories and inter-connectedness of the spread of disease, contagion theory, the rise of cities, and the nature of scientific inquiry, offering both a riveting history and a powerful explanation of how it has shaped the world we live in.

2. In the Sanctuary of Outcasts by Neil W. White III

The emotional, incredible true story of Neil White, a man who discovers the secret to happiness, leading a fulfilling life, and the importance of fatherhood in the most unlikely of places—the last leper colony in the continental United States.

3. The Hot Zone: The Terrifying True Story of the Origins of the Ebola Virus by Richard Preston

A highly infectious, deadly virus from the central African rain forest suddenly appears in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. There is no cure. In a few days 90 percent of its victims are dead. A secret military SWAT team of soldiers and scientists is mobilized to stop the outbreak of this exotic “hot” virus. The Hot Zone tells this dramatic story, giving a hair-raising account of the appearance of rare and lethal viruses and their “crashes” into the human race. Shocking, frightening, and impossible to ignore, The Hot Zone proves that truth really is scarier than fiction.

4. Pandemic 1918: The Story of the Deadliest Influenza in History by Catharine Arnold

In January 1918, as World War I raged on, a new and terrifying virus began to spread across the globe. In three successive waves, from 1918 to 1919, influenza killed more than 50 million people. German soldiers termed it Blitzkatarrh, British soldiers referred to it as Flanders Grippe, but world-wide, the pandemic gained the notorious title of “Spanish Flu.” Nowhere on earth escaped: the United States recorded 550,000 deaths (five times its total military fatalities in the war), while European deaths totaled more than two million.

Amid the war, some governments suppressed news of the outbreak. Even as entire battalions were decimated, with both the Allies and the Germans suffering massive casualties, the details of many servicemen’s deaths were hidden to protect public morale. Meanwhile, civilian families were being struck down in their homes. Philadelphia ran out of gravediggers and coffins, and mass burial trenches had to be excavated with steam shovels. Spanish flu conjured up the specter of the Black Death of 1348 and the great plague of 1665, while the medical profession, shattered after five terrible years of conflict, lacked the resources to contain and defeat this new enemy. Through primary and archival sources, historian Catharine Arnold gives readers the first truly global account of this terrible epidemic.

5. Fever 1793 by Laurie Halse Anderson

It’s late summer 1793, and the streets of Philadelphia are abuzz with mosquitoes and rumors of fever. Down near the docks, many have taken ill, and the fatalities are mounting. Now they include Polly, the serving girl at the Cook Coffeehouse. But fourteen-year-old Mattie Cook doesn’t get a moment to mourn the passing of her childhood playmate. New customers have overrun her family’s coffee shop, located far from the mosquito-infested river, and Mattie’s concerns of fever are all but overshadowed by dreams of growing her family’s small business into a thriving enterprise. But when the fever begins to strike closer to home, Mattie’s struggle to build a new life must give way to a new fight—the fight to stay alive.

6. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

Set in the days of civilization’s collapse, Station Eleven tells the story of a Hollywood star, his would-be savior, and a nomadic group of actors roaming the scattered outposts of the Great Lakes region, risking everything for art and humanity.

One snowy night a famous Hollywood actor slumps over and dies onstage during a production of King Lear. Hours later, the world as we know it begins to dissolve. Moving back and forth in time—from the actor’s early days as a film star to fifteen years in the future, when a theater troupe known as the Traveling Symphony roams the wasteland of what remains—this suspenseful, elegiac, spellbinding novel charts the strange twists of fate that connect five people: the actor, the man who tried to save him, the actor’s first wife, his oldest friend, and a young actress with the Traveling Symphony, caught in the crosshairs of a dangerous self-proclaimed prophet.

This Podcast Will Kill You

Grad students studying disease ecology, Erin and Erin found themselves disenchanted with the insular world of academia. They wanted a way to share their love of epidemics and weird medical mysteries with the world, not just colleagues. Plus, who doesn’t love an excuse to have a cocktail while chatting about pus and poop?

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

Reading All Day

Welcome to quarantine reading. What else is there to do? Honestly, I could be cleaning out a closet (or two) but that’s not going to take my mind off the reality of what’s going on in the world. I’ve never been more grateful for my “Want to Read” list on Goodreads.

Read All Day: March

1. Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan ⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

You know, I’m really starting to think the whole world is just a patchwork quilt of crazy little cults, all with their own secret spaces, their own records, their own rules.

2. A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson ⭐️⭐️

Genre: YA Mystery

The people you love weren’t algebra: to be calculated, subtracted, or held at arm’s length across a decimal point.

3. Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

There’s too much blank sky where a tree once stood.

4. The Dry by Jane Harper ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Mystery

Hidden somewhere in the dark, the cicadas screeched.

5. Alone: Orphaned on the Ocean by Richard Logan, Tere Duperrault ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: True Crime

She really was a female Moses in the bulrushes, a waif cast adrift on the waters who would begin her life all over again, almost from scratch.

6. The Moment of Lift: How Empowering Women Changes the World by Melinda Gates ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Nonfiction

That is why we women have to lift each other up—not to replace men at the top of the hierarchy, but to become partners with men in ending hierarchy.

7. The Girl With the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Nonfiction

I wear my mistakes like badges of honor, and I celebrate them.

8. Summer of ’69 by Elin Hilderbrand ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Historical Fiction

Telling the truth when you’ve done something wrong is the most terrifying thing in the world.

9. Half Broke Horses by Jeanette Walls ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Autobiography

Sometimes something catastrophic can occur in a split second that changes a person’s life forever; other times one minor incident can lead to another and then another and another, eventually setting off just as big a change in a body’s life.

10. Son (The Giver Quartet, #4) by Lois Lowry ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: YA Fiction

Evil can do anything, for a price.

11. Lost and Found by Orson Scott Card ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: YA Fiction

If everybody says something, it’s almost always wrong.

12. The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

Hate can be passionate or disengaged; it can come from dislike but also from fear.

13. No Visible Bruises: What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us By Rachel Louise Snyder ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: True Crime

…for every woman killed in the United States from domestic violence homicide, nearly nine are almost killed.

14. Funny, You Don’t Look Autistic: A Comedians Guide to Life on the Spectrum by Michael McCreary ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Autobiography

I was diagnosed with autism at the age of five. I wasn’t diagnosed as a comedian until much later, though I always loved to perform and make people laugh. When I started doing stand-up in my teens, I realized that I could use comedy to help demystify autism and break down stereotypes. 

15. The Shadow Land by Elizabeth Kostova ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Nonfiction

It was the beginning of that long bifurcation that became my life: Obey and hate yourself, survive. Disobey, redeem yourself, perish. I thought later how simply and quickly they had introduced that concept to me, as easily as breaking a little finger.

16. Recursion by Blake Crouch ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Science Fiction

Is déjà vu actually the specter of false timelines that never happened but did, casting their shadows upon reality?

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

Let’s Talk Books

It’s cold here and getting through the tail end of winter would be hard for me if I didn’t have some good books to read. A few of my choices were in honor of Black History Month.

Read All Day: February

1. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Classic

They’re certainly entitled to think that, and they’re entitled to full respect for their opinions… but before I can live with other folks I’ve got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn’t abide by majority rule is a person’s conscience.

2. Ask Again, Yes by Mary Beth Keane ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

We repeat what we don’t repair.

3. Maybe You Should Talk to Someone by Lori Gottlieb ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Nonfiction

Don’t judge your feelings; notice them. Use them as your map. Don’t be afraid of the truth.

4. Salvage the Bones by Jesmyn Ward ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

And I get up because it is the only thing I can do.

5. The Family Upstairs by Lisa Jewell ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Mystery

I’d subliminally determined at this point that the only way to really know what was going on in the world was to listen to women talk. Anyone who ignores the chatter of women is poorer by any measure.

6. The Girl with the Louding Voice by Abi Dare ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

I feel a free that I didn’t feel in long time and when I smile, it climb from inside my stomach and spread itself on my teeths.

7. The Weed That Strings the Hangman’s Bag by Alan Bradley ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Mystery

I have learned that under certain circumstances, a fib is not only permissible, but can even be an act of perfect grace.

8. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

What I mean to say is, the more you remember, the more you’ve lost.

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

I Love Books!

What would I do without books? I often feel like I don’t have enough time to read all the books on my list and I start to panic. Then, I remind myself, it’s not an assignment I have to finish. It’s purely for my enjoyment and to open my mind to other worlds and perspectives. And then I continue on reading.

Read All Day: January

1. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

Murderers are not monsters, they’re men. And that’s the most frightening thing about them.

2. Coraline by Neil Gaiman ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Paranormal Fiction

Now you people have names. That’s because you don’t know who you are. We know who we are, so we don’t need names.

3. Do You Mind If I Cancel? (Things That Still Annoy Me) by Gary Janetti ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Nonfiction

Don’t worry about being normal. It’s an awful thing to aspire to.

4. Gathering Blue (The Giver, #2) by Lois Lowry ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Young Adult

Take pride in your pain; you are stronger than those who have none.

5. So Close to Being the Sh*t, Y’all Don’t Even Know by Retta ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Autobiography

Bitch, stop wasting time fearing the worst! Living through the worst is never as hard as fearing it. Fight the fear and go do what you gotta do. That’s what you came here for.

6. Nothing To See Here by Kevin Wilson ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

I started to care less about the future. I cared more about making the present tolerable. And time passed.

7. Whisper Network by Chandler Baker ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

We followed the recipe and set the timer for eighteen months and figured by then, the glass ceiling would have shattered under the weight of all the world’s leaning women.

8. Messenger (The Giver, #3) by Lois Lowry ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Young Adult

Things seem more when you’re little. They seem bigger, and distances seem farther.

9. The Rosie Result by Graeme Simsion ⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Fiction

It is a sign of intelligence to recognize our limitations and of maturity to seek help when required.

10. The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Genre: Mystery

Sunset Towers faced east and had no towers.

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

blur-books-close-up-159866

Need a Good Read?

Is anyone else as ready for summer as I am? Aprils sporadic weather had me feeling, well…blah. At least I had some good books to get me through.

Read All Day: April

1. Watching You by Lisa Jewel

Genre: Fiction, Thriller

Because that’s the thing with getting what you want: all that yearning and dreaming and fantasizing leaves a great big hole that can only be filled with more yearning and dreaming and fantasizing.

2. The Magician by Michael Scott

the_magician
Genre: Fantasy, Young Adult

If you tell people everything you take away their opportunity to learn.

3. I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith

i_capture_the_castle
Genre: Fiction, Classics

Perhaps if I make myself write I shall find out what is wrong with me.

4. Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah

winter_garden
Genre: Historical Fiction

We women make choices for others, not for ourselves, and when we are mothers, we . . . bear what we must for our children.

5. When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

when_breath_becomes_air
Genre: Nonfiction, Memoir

Human knowledge is never contained in one person. It grows from the relationships we create between each other and the world, and still it is never complete.

6. Hey Ladies!: The Story of 8 Best Friends, 1 Year, and Way, Way Too Many Emails by Michelle Markowitz, Caroline Moss and Illustrated by Carolyn Bahar

hey_ladies
Genre: Fiction, Humor

Mason jars. Chalk menus. Social media tie-ins. I’m probably speaking another language to you, right!?

7. The Rosie Effect by Graeme Simsion

the_rosie_effect
Genre: Fiction

Dishonesty was part of the price of being a social animal, and of marriage in particular.

8. Cinder by Marissa Meyer

cinder
Genre: Young Adult, Fantasy

Mirrors have an uncanny way of telling the truth.

9. The Indigo Girl by Natasha Boyd

the_indigo_girls
Genre: Historical Fiction

It seemed a ridiculously careless accident that made me a female rather than a male. The rest of the time I wondered why it should make a difference at all. But it did.

10. Highly Illogical Behavior by John Corey Whaley

highly_illogical_behavior
Genre: Young Adult

What he feared the most was that all this hiding had made it impossible for him to ever be found again.

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

= Favorite Read

= Read with Kids

black-and-white-books-design

Looking for a Good Book?

A quick road trip mid-month led to a few extra books on the list this month. Do you like to listen to audiobooks while you drive? What are your favorites?

Read all Day: March

1. Got Ideas? by Justin Jones & Scott Waddell

got_ideas

Building products can seem like a daunting task if you think about everything that has to happen. But if you take it one step at a time, and surround yourself with the right likeminded people, it’s not as massive of an undertaking as you might think. Not to say that you won’t crash and burn. You might? But you have to be willing to fail, over and over again. This very thing is what separates the builders, creators, and doers from the mere dreamers and talkers.

Genre: Nonfiction, Entrepreneur

2. The Hot Zone by Richard Preston

the_hot_zone

To mess around with Ebola is an easy way to die. Better to work with something safer, such as anthrax.

Genre: Nonfiction, Science, History

3. The Penderwicks by Jeanne Birdsall

the_penderwicks

Skye’s always saying exactly the wrong thing to people-it wasn’t just special for you.

Genre: Fiction, Childrens

4. Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

where_the_crawdads_sing

Most of what she knew, she’d learned from the wild. Nature had nurtured, tutored, and protected her when no one else would.

Genre: Fiction

5. Final Girls by Riley Sager

final_girls

Because here’s the thing about details—they can also be a distraction. Add too many and it obscures the brutal truth about a situation.

Genre: Fiction, Thriller, Mystery

6. The Winter Sister by Megan Collins

the_winter_sister

We O’Leary women—we keep our promises to our sisters.

Genre: Fiction, Mystery, Thriller

7. Tweak by Nic Sheff

tweak

Trying is terrifying because I know I will just fail. But I do want things to be different. I do…I am so afraid. I’m afraid to hope again.

Genre: Nonfiction, Memoir, Mental Health

8. The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly

the_evolution_of_calpurnia_tate

I had never classified myself with other girls. I was not of their species; I was different. I had never thought my future would be like theirs.

Genre: Historical Fiction

9. Goodbye, Vitamin by Rachel Khong

goodbye_vitamin

A long time ago I stopped wondering why there are so many crazy people. What surprises me now is that there are so many sane ones.

Genre: Fiction, Contemporary

10. Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech

walk_two_moons

You can’t keep the birds of sadness from flying over your head, but you can keep them from nesting in your hair.

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult

11. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume

tales_of_a_fourth_grade_nothing

Some people might think that my mother is my biggest problem… but my mother isn’t my biggest problem. Neither is my father… My biggest problem is my brother, Farley Drexel Hatcher.

Genre: Fiction, Childrens

12. Yes Please by Amy Poehler

yes_please

You have to be where you are to get where you need to go.

Genre: Nonfiction, Autobiography

13. Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen

along_for_the_ride

Just because something’s damaged doesn’t mean it shouldn’t be treated with respect.

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult

14. Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys

between_shades_of_gray

A wrongdoing doesn’t give you the right to do wrong.

Genre: Historical Fiction

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

= Favorite Read

= Read with Kids

take_a_book

Need A Book Recommendation?

Read All Day: February

What a month! Have you read any of these? If so, let me know what you thought in the comments. I’d love to hear what you’ve been reading. Share the love.

1. Where She Went by Gayle Forman

where_she_went

You were so busy trying to be my savior that you left me all alone.

Genre: Young Adult, Romance, Contemporary, Fiction

2. My Squirrel Days by Ellie Kemper

my_squirrel_days

One of my great hobbies in life is feeling sorry for myself. Nothing makes me feel more alive than when I suspect I have been wronged. Oh, the energy!

Genre: Non Fiction, Memoir, Humor

3. Then She Was Gone by Lisa Jewell

then_she_was_gone

When I read a book it feels like real life and when I put the book down it’s like I go back into the dream.

Genre: Mystery, Thriller, Fiction

4. The Alchemyst by Michael Scott

the_alchemyst

At the heart of every legend there is a grain of truth.

Genre: Fantasy, Young Adult, Fiction

5. Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

murder_on_the_orient_express

The impossible could not have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.

Genre: Mystery, Classics, Fiction

6. The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

the_secret_life_of_bees

After you get stung, you can’t get unstung
no matter how much you whine about it.

Genre: Historical Fiction

7. The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg by Rodman Philbrick

the_mostly_true_adventures_of_homer_p_figg

It all boils down to this: A person has only two options in life, to do something or to do nothing.

Genre: Historical Fiction, Adventure, Young Adult

8. Beautiful Boy by David Sheff

beautiful boy

I am becoming used to an overwhelming, grinding mixture of anger and worry…

Genre: Non Fiction, Memoir

9. Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

everything_i_never_told_you

The things that go unsaid are often the things that eat at you.

Genre: Fiction, Mystery, Contemporary

10. Finding Audrey by Sophie Kinsella

finding_audrey

We’re all on a jagged graph. I know I am. Up a bit, down a bit. That’s life.

Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary, Romance, Fiction

11. My Not So Perfect Life by Sophie Kinsella

my_not_so_perfect_life

Every time you see someone’s bright-and-shiny, remember: They have their own crappy truths too.

Genre: Fiction, Romance, Contemporary

12. The Invisible Life of Ivan Insaenko by Scott Stambach

the_invisible_life_of_ivan_isaenko

Don’t die before you’re dead. And if you do, let it be the good kind…when the only part of you that dies is who you were supposed to be.

Genre: Fiction, Young Adult, Contemporary

13. Becoming by Michelle Obama

becoming

If you don’t get out there and define yourself, you’ll be quickly and inaccurately defined by others.

Genre: Memoir, Nonfiction

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

= Favorite Read

= Read with Kids

What Book Should I Read Next?

How many times have you asked yourself that same question? Well, get ready for the answer. This year I’ll be adding a monthly list of the books I’ve been reading to the blog. Read All Day (RAD) will be a complete list (the good, the bad, and the ugly) of the books I read the previous month. So, here goes:

 

Read All Day: January

1. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty

                                Nine Perfect Strangers

“The lowest point of your life can lead to the highest.”

Genre: Fiction

 

2. Radium Girls by Kate Moore

                                                                                                                          The Radium Girls

“Radium, he determined, was dangerous. It was just that nobody told the girls…”

Genre: Non Fiction, History, Science, Biography

 

3. The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena

    The Couple Next Door

“Everyone is faking it, all of them pretending to be something they’re not. The whole world is built on lies and deceit.”

Genre: Mystery, Thriller, Fiction, Suspense

 

4. Olive’s Ocean by Kevin Henkes

     Olive's Ocean

 “Home was the same as when Martha had left it, but because “she” had changed, her world seemed slightly different, as though she were seeing everything in sharper focus.”

Genre: Young Adult, Realistic Fiction, Middle Grade

 

5. Locomotion by Jacqueline Woodson

                                                                                    Locomotion

 “No matter how big you get, it’s still okay to cry because everybody’s got a right to their own tears.”

Genre: Poetry, Realistic Fiction, Young Adult, Middle Grade, African American

 

 

6. A Stranger in the House by Shari Lapena

                                                                                                                               A Stranger In The House

“Suspicion is an insidious thing: doubts have started creeping in, things that he’d previously been able to ignore.”

Genre: Mystery, Thriller, Fiction, Suspense

 

7. Circe by Madeline Miller

                                                                    Circe

    “It is a common saying that women are delicate creatures, flowers, eggs, anything that may be crushed in a moment’s carelessness. If I had ever believed it, I no longer did.”

Genre: Fantasy, Fiction, Mythology, Historical Fiction

 

8. Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis by J.D. Vance

                                                                                                        Hillbilly Elegy

“whenever people ask me what I’d most like to change about the white working class, I say, “The feeling that our choices don’t matter.”

Genre: Non Fiction, Memoir, Biography, Politics

 

9. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

                                              The Fault In Our Stars

“But it is the nature of stars to cross, and never was Shakespeare more wrong than when he has Cassius note, ‘The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars / But in ourselves.”

Genre: Young Adult, Romance, Contemporary, Realistic Fiction, Coming of Age

 

10. If I Stay by Gayle Forman

                                                                                                                                   If I Stay

“Dying is easy. Living is hard.”

Genre: Young Adult, Romance, Contemporary, Fiction

 

11. Rabbit: The Autobiography of Ms. Pat by Patricia Williams

 

Rabbit the Autobiography of Ms. Pat

“The way you turn  a sad story around, you should be a comedian! You’re the funniest person I know.”

Genre: Memoir, Non Fiction

 

12. An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

                                                                                   An American Marriage

“There are too many loose ends in the world in need of knots.”

Genre: Fiction, Contemporary

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish

Baby Feet

10 Mom Approved Infant Care Books

Don’t get overwhelmed with the number of infant care books out there. There are so many different books, because there are so many different ways to parent your newborn.  The right one is the one you choose.

1. Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child by Marc Weissbluth

Healthy Sleep Habits, Happy Child

2. Baby Wise by Gary Ezzo & Robert Bucknam

Baby Wise

3. The Happiest Baby On The Block by Harvey Karp

The Happiest Baby on the Block

4. What To Expect The First Year by Heidi Murkoff & Sharon Mazel

What to Expect the First Year

5. Babycenter.com

6. The Baby Book by Dr. Sears

The Baby Book

7. Save Our Sleep: Helping Your Baby Sleep Through the Night From Birth to Two Years by Tizzie Hall

Save Our Sleep

8. The Rights of Infants by Margaret A. Ribble

Don’t let the publishing date discourage you.  It come highly recommended and has five star reviews on Amazon.

The Rights of Infants

9. Children: The Challenge by Rudolf Dreikurs with Vicki Soltz

Don’t let the publishing date discourage you.  It come highly recommended and has five star reviews on Amazon.

Children: The Challenge

10. Parenting with Love and Logic by Foster Cline & Jim Fay

Parenting with Love & Logic

 

Now, Go. See. Do.

~meemish